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Wednesday, May 30
 

10:00am

A Better Way to Buy IT: Lessons in Modular Contracting
A Better Way to Buy IT: Lessons in Modular Contracting
 
LED BY: Alla Seiffert, Jessie Posilkin, and Robin Carnahan, 18F Half day

You can do great tech procurements without changing procurement policy. 18F, the State of California, and other municipalities have shown us that you break up monolithic, waterfall RFPs and recraft them for success. Come learn how to make acquisition joyful with modular contracting. You will leave with both a thorough understanding of best practices, procurement strategies, and sample language you can take home and use tomorrow.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:00am - 1:00pm
Junior Ballroom 1

10:00am

Civic Service Design Tools + Tactics
Civic Service Design Tools + Tactics
 
LED BY: Mari Nakano and Darnell Sessoms
Half day

Service design can help government better meet the needs of its residents—emphasizing a holistic approach, partnering the people who use services with the public servants and nonprofit providers who deliver them. In this half-day workshop, the Service Design Studio at the NYC Mayor’s Office for Economic Opportunity will lead participants through a hands-on overview of Civic Service Design Tools + Tactics, an introduction to service design created by public servants with and for public servants.

In this workshop, you will learn a set of practical ways to include design methods in your work. Together we will use the Tools + Tactics to define a pressing challenge you are facing in the delivery of your program or service, set goals for how it can be improved, map the stakeholders involved, create a visual guide for how they interact with your service, and begin a plan for field research. At the end of the session, you will have a pitch to take back to your team on how to use these methods and the next steps for your project.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:00am - 1:00pm
Room 203

10:00am

Demystifying Machine Learning and Data Science
Demystifying Data Sharing: Local Governments Can, and Should, Ethically Share Data
 
LED BY: Lynn Overmann and Catie Bialick
Half day

Policymakers and practitioners increasingly see the value of using data to help inform their decisions, provide more targeted services, and improve critical programs. Local government data often sit in silos across, or even within, government agencies, making legal—and ethical—data sharing a key step to leveraging data science to help government improve. Understanding the laws and regulations that govern the use of data for research and analysis while ensuring that data is used responsibly is a critical component of a successful data or tech project.

THE GOALS OF THE WORKSHOP ARE TO:

▸ Share successful approaches to responsible data sharing and collaboration
▸ Address questions around interpreting privacy laws and identifying allowable pathways for sharing government data
▸ Discuss the ethical use of data and how we can acknowledge, understand and minimize bias in algorithms/models

Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:00am - 1:00pm
Grand Ballroom G & H

10:00am

Hacking Hiring: How to get the right people in the right door
Hacking Hiring: How to get the Right People in the Right Door

LED BY: Jen Tress, Senior Advisor, GSA; Chief of Staff, Technology Transformation Service, GSA and Senior Consultant/Hiring
Half day

Hiring is often viewed as an HR function, but it requires engagement from a deep and varied group of people to bring on incredible, diverse talent (and set them up for success). This session will make the case that hiring should be treated the same as any program or service launch, and the positive impact that can happen when you think of the organization as the product. Through a mix of info sharing, discussion and time-boxed exercises, participants will walk out with:

  • A good understanding of hiring challenges, why they exist and how to solve them
  • 7 steps to hiring success
  • A strategy to hit the ground running for your #1 hiring target
  • A job profile to start attracting talent

This session is for anyone deeply involved in hiring - from those who need people to join their team, to recruiters and staff who are responsible for running people operations - and combines strong practices from both the private and public sectors.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:00am - 1:00pm
Room 210/211

10:00am

Product Management 101
Product Management 101
 
LED BY: Nikki Lee, Product Manager 18F
Half day

Product management as a recognized discipline and job title has been largely absent from government despite the rise of digital services as the most critical channel for interaction and transaction with the public. But whatever they’re called, the skills and practices of product managers are an absolutely critical element of government’s capacity to succeed in a digital world, and they are distinct in many ways from program or project management. Whether your team is in-house or contracted or somewhere in between, great product management skills and empowered product managers on your team will make all the difference in building digital services that work.

This workshop for civil servants introduces product management as a discipline, covers why it’s critical in a government context, and gives participants a path towards developing their product management skills. We will discuss what individual product managers are responsible for, and the organizational support they need in order to succeed, before diving into hands-on activities that will give everyone a taste of what it's like to own a product.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:00am - 1:00pm
Room 208

10:00am

Security and Risk Management: Securing Agile Digital Services
Security and Risk Management: Securing Agile Digital Services

LED BY:  Michael Brunton-Spall
Half day

If you are building digital services, using agile methodologies, then you will find that security departments often don't appear to be your friend. The risk management and information assurance practices that are common in government are designed for traditional waterfall processes.

This workshop will cover how risk management and information assurance works, how those processes interact with agile programmes of work and what things you can do to turn a combative relationship into a productive relationship with security.

Secondly, this workshop will also look at modern digital service architecture, and common architectural patterns that help produce secure digital services, including cloud architectural patterns. This section of the workshop won't require strong technical experience, and should be suitable for product managers or project managers to help guide conversations with the technical teams.

The details of the workshop will be guided by the participants, so come along with questions and ideas of what you'd like to learn.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:00am - 1:00pm
Room 202

10:00am

Slack to the Future
Slack to the Future

Half day
Part 1: (Re)-Introduction to Slack. Get to know Slack, whether it's brand new to you or you're already a serious ++pro user. What makes it a "Collaboration Hub"? What can it do for your organization? Who is using Slack and what are they doing on it (we'll have stories and we'll also ask for workshop attendees' stories)?

The focus of this conversation will be on getting everyone on the same page so we can move ahead with a common understanding. We'll also want to get to know the folks in the room to confirm we're having the most fruitful conversations.

Part 2: How we teach Slack to Slack employees We'll share our in-house curriculum for teaching Slack to new Slack employees, and we'll show you how to streamline your work so the right person can find the right information (or it can find them) whenever they need it.

The focus of this section will be on hands-on learning. The "Slacktualization" pyramid of maturity may make an appearance. We'll talk about finding the right balance of transparency and confidentiality for your organization, and about the MAYA acronym and change management.

Part 3: Let's collaborate! We'll break into teams and play some games to help you see what you can do with Slack. Add in apps. Create message actions. Build interactions with people and data. Try to find some easter eggs.

Then we'll review the games and reflect on what we each of us learned. There should be prizes. We'll also dig into the administrative side of Slack and give you a view into Slack's backend analytics and platform, and how they were essential parts to make the game work.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:00am - 1:00pm
Room 201

10:00am

User-Centered Design: Design Thinking for Government Innovation
User-Centered Design: Design Thinking for Government Innovation
 LED BY: Kate Lydon and Peter Jackson, IDEO
Half day

How civil servants envision government services can be radically different from how citizens experience them. Even with the best intentions, smart policy, and lots of hard work, benefits are going unclaimed, customer satisfaction scores are low, and the government employees on the front lines can feel hamstrung and frustrated. But design tools can provide new ways to create surprising and delightful experiences for both customers and civil servants—and increase the impact and efficiency of delivering public services.

During this hands-on workshop, you'll learn about several new methods global design company IDEO is using to help government agencies innovate. Matched with an IDEO designer, you'll break out into a track specific to the work you're doing—like managing social safety net benefits or streamlining digital services—to brainstorm and plan ways to use these tools when you get back to the office. 

Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:00am - 1:00pm
Grand Ballroom A & B

1:00pm

Lunch
Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
TBA

2:00pm

Delivery-Driven Policy
Delivery-Driven Policy: The Next Frontier

LED BY: Kate Lydon, IDEO
Half day

As digital increasingly becomes a core competency of government, civil servants who work in both policy and delivery are realizing that the real value of these new ways of working reaches far beyond better websites. As Cecilia Muñoz said, “iterative and user-centered isn’t just how we should be doing tech, it’s how we should be governing.” As digital delivery teams from one perspective and regulators and policymakers from another perspective start working together much earlier in the process, the nascent practices of a hybrid discipline are emerging. The civil servants who are pioneering this process and using real world feedback to drive an iterative process of, for instance, writing regulations, report that they are doing the best work of their careers. We call this delivery-driven policy. 

Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 210/211

2:00pm

Demystifying Data Sharing: Local governments can, and should, ethically share data
Demystifying Data Sharing: Local Governments Can, and Should, Ethically Share Data
 
LED BY: Lynn Overmann and Catie Bialick
Half day

Policymakers and practitioners increasingly see the value of using data to help inform their decisions, provide more targeted services, and improve critical programs. Local government data often sit in silos across, or even within, government agencies, making legal—and ethical—data sharing a key step to leveraging data science to help government improve. Understanding the laws and regulations that govern the use of data for research and analysis while ensuring that data is used responsibly is a critical component of a successful data or tech project.

THE GOALS OF THE WORKSHOP ARE TO:

▸ Share successful approaches to responsible data sharing and collaboration
▸ Address questions around interpreting privacy laws and identifying allowable pathways for sharing government data
▸ Discuss the ethical use of data and how we can acknowledge, understand and minimize bias in algorithms/models

Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Grand Ballroom G & H

2:00pm

Design Research 101
Design Research 101

LED BY: Elizabeth Goodman, Acting Director of Design at 18F. and Amber Reed, Chief Service Designer, Whole Person Care SF Department of Public Health
Half day

Maybe this whole “design research” thing is new to you. Maybe you just want a refresher on the basics. Maybe you’ve done usability testing before, but aren’t sure how it works in government.

In all cases, this workshop is for you. It will cover the essentials of discovery research and usability testing within state and local government. We’ll start with basic principles and methods, then move quickly into hands-on practice. Our goal is have every participant leave this workshop feeling confident that they are ready for a crucial activity in public service.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Junior Ballroom 1

2:00pm

Effective Community Engagement Requires User-Based Design
Effective Community Engagement Requires User-Based Design
 
LED BY: Susan Clark, Founder and Director, Common Knowledge Group
Half day

Knowing when and how to invite community input into government decisions has become an essential skill for civic leaders. This interactive workshop is for those who have worked at the state or local level to increase civic participation and can bring their experiences of what went well and what didn’t. We’ll unpack differences between “civic culture” and “community culture” to show how to enhance the user’s experience while also building trust. You will learn how local governments are using lean, iterative approaches to design, invite and report community input. City leaders will share case studies about how they reach beyond the “familiar faces,” get more useful input and build stronger community networks. Participants will leave with tools they can use right away for more inclusive, informed and sustained engagement.

This workshop drew rave reviews from participants at the last Code for America Summit, and we are delighted to welcome Susan back to offer it to more of our community. 

Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Grand Ballroom A & B

2:00pm

Procuring Better Outcomes: Views from the Front
Procuring Better Outcomes: View from the Vendor Front

LED BY: Ryan Gillette, Assistant Director, Harvard Social Impact Bond Technical Assistance Lab
Half day

Years after the launch and rescue of Healthcare.gov, a number of vendors have sprung up to serve government technology needs. This workshop, run by three companies with a significant number of employees and revenue from federal government clients, will cover the strategies, approaches, and lessons learned that can help governments from municipal all the way to federal deliver simpler, clearer, faster technology that meets user needs.

PANELISTS:
Ad Hoc: Paul Smith, co-founder and CTO and Kaitlin Devine, Director of Innovation
Exygy: Zach Berke, founder, Exygy
Truss: Mark Ferlatte, CTO and Nic Wissman, Program Manager for Government Engagement

Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 202

2:00pm

Prototyping For People Who Hate Wasting Money
Rapid Prototyping Workshop: Iterate quick and effective low-fidelity prototypes to improve usability
 
LED BY: Stephanie Nguyen and Sabrina Williams
Half day

We are faced with building solutions to highly complex problems with dense policies, hundreds of stakeholders and vulnerable populations who need services and help everyday. How do we build something in a feasible time frame without packing features into one massive release?

After the problem statement and ideation phase, the prototyping phase comes in. Using user-centered design methods, we will guide workshop participants to [design > test > build] through key prototyping concepts. Here, we will guide you step-by-step through exercises that show you how to rapidly prototype low-resolution concepts from hand-drawn sketches to clickable prototypes to better meet the needs of your users.

THE GOALS OF THE WORKSHOP ARE TO:

▸ Learn what products and processes look like in various stages (beginning to end)
▸ Use goal/metric-focused design; a simple framework to learn and iterate
▸ Layout and learn low-resolution prototype options
▸ Effectively communicate, deliver and measure usability tests with users
▸ Document and present process + receive feedback from stakeholders

WHO SHOULD ATTEND:
▸ Those involved with scoping, managing, or delivering the technical and design requirements of a project
▸ Roles that are more hands-on in the development, design and iteration (as opposed to high-level lead roles) in seeing the delivery of the product or service
▸ Front-end engineers or technical team members who work closely with design teams to be able to pair work
▸ Team members who need a framework to generate ideas for a digital product and a prototype ready for user testing
▸ Beginners welcome, no prior experience is needed

Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 208

2:00pm

So Now You're a Manager
So Now You're A Manager

LED BY: Jen Dary
Half day

What does a successful day look like as a manager? What are the nuts and bolts of corralling humans? And how are you supposed to get anything done when your calendar is booked solid with meetings? So Now You’re A Manager is designed to support new managers through this kind of career transition, setting them up to be impactful, confident, knowledgeable leaders. After all, if you don’t see yourself as a leader, no one else will.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 201

2:00pm

Standards that Work
Standards that Work

LED BY: Louise Downe
Half day

It's easy to reach for standards to improve the quality of our services.

Creating simple, clear instructions on what good looks like and how to get there sounds like a great idea, and it is. But standards only work if they're right and people follow them.

In this workshop we'll look at how to make standards work. We'll look at what it means to treat public servants like users and the full spectrum of things you need to do to support these users to build great public services.

Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 203
 
Thursday, May 31
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Thursday May 31, 2018 7:30am - 8:30am
West Hall

8:30am

Thursday Mainstage Talks
Welcome 
Jennifer Pahlka, Code for America
Dan Hon, Summit Co-Chair
David Eaves, Summit Host and Lecturer, Harvard Kennedy School
Your co-chairs and hosts want you to get the most of our two days together, and to go home refreshed, renewed, and recommitted. We’ll start with that end in mind.

What’s at Stake Here
David Plouffe, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative
David may be best known as the campaign manager for Barack Obama's successful 2008 presidential campaign, and then Senior Advisor to the President, but he now has another powerful platform for change, leading policy and advocacy for the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. Among other efforts to promote justice and opportunity, David’s team at CZI supports work to transform how government delivers services to the American people. What’s at stake if we don’t make government work as it should in a digital age? More than you might think. Strengthening government’s ability to serve all Americans with respect and dignity is critical to our nation’s future.

Staying the Course
Joanne Collins Smee, Executive Director, IT Modernization Centers of Excellence, General Services Administration
Joanne now leads the GSA’s work to transform government’s approach to technology that began under the Obama Administration, and she is passionately committed to the mission, the approach, and seeing this work through in the service of the American people. Come hear how the Technology Transformation Service and its Centers of Excellence are putting digital principles into action in federal agencies and providing leadership for change that everyone in government can benefit from.

Building on a Bedrock of Failure
Rodney Mullen, skateboarder, entrepreneur, inventor
Failure sucks, especially for skydivers and bomb-diffusers. For skateboarders, it’s a necessary part of progress; hence, they develop a well-honed eye for risk assessment as well as a clarity to flush out what are real vs imagined dangers, giving rise to a confidence to go after more creative, daring, and better outcomes. This is why the best skaters tend to be the best fallers, because a kind of intuition for minimizing damage emerges, so seemingly catastrophic falls become sustainable, which eventually forms a hardened foundation that can hardly be attained in any other way.

Blameless Post Mortems
John Allspaw, Adaptive Capacity Labs
John is an inspiring leader among engineers, but you don’t need to be technical to benefit from his message. Too often in government, we’re told to minimize risk and avoid mistakes at all costs. The reality is that mistakes and accidents happen when working with complex systems; how we respond to them makes all the difference in whether learning from them will happen or not. Systems and the cultures responsible for their operation can become more brittle and locked down, or we can learn from mistakes and become more resilient. The latter path starts with blameless post-incident reviews, part of management principles known as forward-looking accountability and just culture, which come from research in domains like aviation, medicine, and manufacturing. Evolving how we learn from incidents in these ways is critical to turning accidents into real investments in the future.

Delivery-Driven Advocacy that Transforms the Criminal Justice System
Evonne Silva, Code for America
Jazmyn Latimer, Code for America
Meilani Santillán, Code for America
Bob Weisengoff, Executive Director, Pretrial Release Services Program, Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services
Brittany Berwanger, Code for Tulsa

How can technology and design help our government create the conditions for a more just society and serve all Americans with respect and dignity? We start by placing the individual at the center of our work, recognizing the importance of those involved in the criminal justice system to be part of solving its greatest challenges, and we challenge assumptions about process that hold us back from helping people at scale. Three examples illustrate these approaches, each in deep collaboration with government partners. ClearMyRecord makes it easier to secure housing and employment, ClientComm reshapes community supervision to support positive outcomes, and CourtBot, a volunteer-led project, reduces pretrial incarceration. In reimagining existing systems through technology, design, and procedural innovation, government can implement policies that rethink incarceration, reduce recidivism, and restore opportunity.”

Case Study: When the System Gets Personal
Denise Peña, Community Justice Manager, Department of Community Justice, Multnomah County, Oregon
When you’re a victim of a crime, the pain can often be compounded by the system that is supposed to support you. Denise Pena became a radical supporter of user-centered design when she was tragically forced to use the very system she worked in. A team at Code for America helped make it easier to get the information victims in Multnomah County need to advocate for themselves and move on.

USDS Update and How are You Keeping Track of This? The U.S. Digital Service and the Appeals Process at the Veterans Administration
Matt Cutts, Acting Administrator, United States Digital Service
Gina Kim, UX Designer and Researcher,
United States Digital Service
Christopher Givens, Information Designer and Technologist United States Digital Service at the Department of Veterans Affairs

Transforming California, Transforming Ourselves
Amy Tong, Chief Information Officer, State of California
Amy was the deputy director of the Office of Systems Integration in 2014 when the State of California began a sudden experiment with user-centered, agile development. It became clear that her leadership was needed to manage these changes and Governor Brown appointed her to the role of CIO. As Amy has led a courageous band of dedicated public servants and newer recruits to government through dramatic changes in approach, the need for government to do better has become personal.

Thursday May 31, 2018 8:30am - 10:40am
East Hall

10:40am

Break
Thursday May 31, 2018 10:40am - 11:00am
East Hall

11:00am

Thursday Mainstage Talks
Reshaping the Government Technology Ecosystem
Rafael Lopez, Accenture
Dan Hon, CfA Summit Co-Chair
Greg Gershman, AdHoc 
Marquis Carbrera, IBM
Three years after the launch of Healthcare.gov, the market for government IT and other services continues to evolve to meet the needs of a digital age. What do we learn from new models and partnerships, especially from how traditional vendors and a new breed of startups are working together? What still needs to happen to build a system that works for government, for the vendors, and most importantly, for the American public? A candid conversation about what's working, what's not, and a reminder of what's at stake.

How to Kill a $745M Project
Raj Shah, startup entrepreneur
Lt Enrique Oti, Managing Director, Air Force Element, Defense Innovation Unit Experimental
Until recently, there’s only been one way to build software in the military. But a whiteboard in a Combined Air Operations Center in Qatar and a small software team in the Bay Area changed that. Congress noticed, and wanted to know why the Air Force was still doing it the old way. This is a story of change that goes from the very small to the very big, and like all the stories at the CfA Summit, it’s just the beginning.

Video: The Talent Initiative

Where We Go From Here
Jennifer Pahlka, Founder and Executive Director, Code for America

User-informed Policymaking
Cecilia Muñoz, New America, former Domestic Policy Council Director
Better government technology is good. But government that actually works better is what we really need, and these approaches to technology development matter most when they serve as a way to improve policy and outcomes. 

Changing the System from the Inside, and the Outside
Lynn Overmann, Arnold Foundation
DJ Patil, former U.S. Chief Data Scientist
Beth Blauer, Executive Director at Johns Hopkins University Center for Government Excellence
When you’re committed to using data to make government work better, you’ll likely be doing this from both inside government and outside at various times. What tactics work best from each vantage point?

Thursday May 31, 2018 11:00am - 12:30pm
East Hall

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday May 31, 2018 12:30pm - 1:30pm
West Hall

1:30pm

Balancing Transparency and Privacy in Modern Governments
Balancing Transparency and Privacy in Modern Governments

LED BY: Reed Duecy-Gibbs, Co-Founder and COO, NextRequest 
Joy Bonaguro, Chief Data Officer, City and County of San Francisco 

DESCRIPTION: The arrival of the internet and the increased ease of access for government records moved the debate around transparency away from concerns about secrecy and has in recent years trended towards issues of privacy. We'll discuss how transparency has changed in the last 10 years and how governments continue to face new legislation that challenges their transparency.

You'll come away from this session with:
  1. A thorough look at how legislation is pushing governments to address new technologies to balance their transparency with privacy.
  2. Ideas on how your agency can put measures in place to manage privacy while at the same time make appropriate information publicly available.
  3. Real-world examples of how your agency can address transparency and privacy issues right now.

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 203

1:30pm

Birds of a Feather - So You’re Working on: Recruiting and Hiring Outside the Usual Suspects
Birds of a Feather sessions bring people struggling with similar issues together to network, learn from each other and overcome isolation. Each session will focus on a different topic but all sessions will be facilitated networking where participants talk with others and share their perspective; and an opportunity for small group discussions. Birds of a Feather sessions are either “Group Therapy” focused on common challenges or “So you’re working on” focused on common elements of work.

So You’re Working on: Recruiting and Hiring Outside the Usual Suspects Facilitator:

FACILITATOR: David Huebner, Principal, Lalo Consulting

DESCRIPTION: Hiring into government isn’t easy. Navigating the government hiring process isn’t easy either. This session will feature emerging work in the government hiring space and discuss how the hiring process becomes a user centered experience. Bring your hiring and recruiting challenges and tried and true practices for discussion.

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 206

1:30pm

Ending the Harassment Among Us
Ending the Harassment Among Us

LED BY:  
Travis Moore, Director, TechCongress, Co-Director, Congress Too
Sabrina Hersi Issa, CEO of Be Bold Media/Co-Creator of Shine Squad
Jess Ladd, Founder of Callisto

DESCRIPTION: Government capability and modernization requires building a safe workspaces. This participatory session is an opportunity for the people working on ending sexual harassment and abuse in civic tech, government, politics and other spheres to connect and collaborate on their work. Each panelist will briefly discuss their work and then break into a workshop format with others that are working on similar efforts, or want to be involved.    

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Anyone working on similar efforts to address harassment, that wants to be involved, or wants to hear about lessons from each of our specific experiences.   

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 210/211

1:30pm

From Policy to Delivery: Implementing the Largest Modern Change to Medicare
From Policy to Delivery: Implementing the Largest Modern Change to Medicare

LED BY:  
Natalie Kates, Product, US Digital Servive 
David Koh, Engineer, US Digital Service  
Mari Miyachi, Engineering, Nava Public Benefit Corporation 
Caitlin Weber, UX Design, Ad Hoc
Mickin Sahni, Product, Ad Hoc
Yadira Sanchez, Product, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services  
Ivana Ng, Product, Nava Public Benefit Corporation

DESCRIPTION: What does it mean to govern well in a digital age? The movement of the past few years to bring digital practices into government has moved past just tech and into delivery-driven policy. For the Medicare Quality Payment Program, delivery-driven policy drove a complete evolution of product development at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services from contract award to production release. This track shares real-world examples of delivery-driven policy in action today and seeks to inspire the next stories of true 21st century government.  

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Anyone who wants to learn more about how policy making is intertwined with tech implementation in the federal government.  

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 208

1:30pm

Getting the Work Done
Getting the Work Done

LED BY: 
Hana Schank, Public Interest Technology Fellow, New America 
Sara Hudson, Public Interest Technology Fellow, New America 

DESCRIPTION: As anyone who has spent time working in or around civic technology knows, there are certain debates that come up time and again. Are we most effective fighting fires or should we work toward changing the culture around design and technology in government? Should we function as consultants, or as specialized innovation teams, or can we make change from the inside as a one-man-band? And ultimately, what is the best way to get stuff done? As Public Interest Technology fellows at New America, we've interviewed more than 70 people in and around government over the last ten months, many working on innovation or digital-service teams, and we’ve got answers. In this session we’ll share what the most effective teams in this space are doing, what works and what doesn’t, and more broadly how the field is thinking and feeling about the hard work we do.  

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: People in civic tech or who want to be, those on digital service teams or government officials who want to introduce some kind of "innovation" or civic tech/design people, teams, or structures to change how their agency/city/state does business. 

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Grand Ballroom G & H

1:30pm

Helping the Helpers: Data-Driven Support for Community Vulnerabilities
Helping the Helpers: Data-Driven Support for Community Vulnerabilities

LED BY:  
John Ridener, Open Data Community Liason, San Mateo County 
Patrick Hammons, Solution Engineer, Esri

DESCRIPTION: This hands-on workshop will focus on San Mateo County's Community Vulnerability Index (CVI) https://cmo.smcgov.org/cvi as a framework for data driven policy, storytelling, and as a means of supporting community services through mapping and data. The CVI serves as a means of engaging County departments, community-based organizations, and OpenSMC (the local Brigade) to identify potential service gaps and opportunities to connect local organizations to data and create a framework to explore associated data without barriers to data collection. Attendees will participate in a structured exercise to surface topics and community-based organizations they can assist in their missions through the CVI's framework and have an opportunity to work with Esri's Hub, Open Data platform, and ArcGIS online during the workshop.    

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Brigade leaders/members who are looking for a data-driven way to identify potential projects and community partners based on need and government folks who want to establish a baseline for program evaluation and find data-driven means to identify potential populations and locations of need.  

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 201

1:30pm

How Local Communities can Prepare for a Successful 2020 Census Count
How Local Communities can Prepare for a Successful 2020 Census Count

LED BY:  
Amy Deora, Director of Government Analytics, Civis Analytics 
Chris Dick, Applied Data Science Manager, Civis Analytics

DESCRIPTION: The decennial census count underlies congressional representation, and more than $600 billion of Federal funding decisions. Since the last census in 2010, there has been a marked decline in trust in social institutions, particularly the federal government. When people trust the government less, they are often less likely to respond to government requests for information. In particular, a potential citizenship question on the 2020 census may be of concern to immigrant communities. Finally, a limited budget for communications and outreach at the Federal level makes it crucial that states, cities, and localities are pro-actively involved to make sure their citizens are counted. In this session, we'll talk about the resources available to prepare for the census, and steps that cities, counties, and community based organizations can take to make sure their citizens are engaged and ready to participate.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: State and local government community engagement leaders, and those responsible for local response to the 2020 census. Funders and community-based organizations that work with traditionally undercounted populations, including young children, rural populations, and immigrant communities.

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Grand Ballroom A & B

1:30pm

How to Standardize and Open Social Services Data in your City
How to Standardize and Open Social Services Data in your City

LED BY:  
Mike Conlow, Head of Technology Consulting, Blue State Digital 
Darnell Sessoms, Product Manager, NYC Mayor's Office for Economic Opportunity
Haiyan Sui, Director of Technology Development, NYC Mayor's Office for Economic Opportunity

DESCRIPTION: Learn how New York City used data to create two products, ACCESS NYC and Growing Up NYC, to make social services more accessible—by using simple technology, clear language, mobile-focused design, and usability testing to put vital resources into the hands of more people. Both products are powered by the Benefits and Programs API, a first of its kind open dataset that includes benefit, program, and resource information on health and human services available to New York City residents. ACCESS NYC is also powered by an eligibility rules engine that screens for eligibility for over 30 programs. NYC is currently in the process of opening the rules engine and publicly sharing the standardized elements. The team will demonstrate the integration of these new social service datasets and walk through the standard elements so that they can be replicated in your city.  

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Health and human service policymakers and program managers and open data managers.   

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 207

1:30pm

Reaching the Last Mile When it Matters Most
Reaching the Last Mile When it Matters Most

LED BY:  
Ben Parks, Twilio 
Beth Niblock, Chief Information Officer, City of Detroit

DESCRIPTION: Beth Niblock, City of Detroit CIO, faced a challenge. She needed to get critical information to constituents about an array of government programs, but faced a severe digital divide (40% lack internet at home) and residents spoke three primary languages. To ensure that emergency notifications, transit updates, and other critical information reached everyone, she needed to tackle this problem creatively.

Nearly universal adoption of mobile devices and has shifted people’s expectations about how they communicate with all types of organizations, even when internet connectivity is not pervasive. People now expect instant access to information, fast response when they contact an organization, and they want to use their preferred channel. In this session, Ben Parks from Twilio and Beth Niblock from the City of Detroit will discuss how Detroit rapidly developed a new communication system capable of reaching every resident in the city to deliver information when residents need it most.

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 204

1:30pm

Reshaping the Defense Ecosystem at DIUx (Defense Innovation Unit Experimental)
Reshaping the Defense Ecosystem at DIUx (Defense Innovation Unit Experimental)

LED BY:  
Raj Shah (Speakers) , Former Managing Partner, DIUx
Colonel Enrique Oti (Speakers) , DIUx

DESCRIPTION: DUIx has been changing how the Department of Defense procures by making it easier for startups to do business with Department. They've also been changing expectations and resetting the bar for how software is done; Air Force Colonel Oti experienced his first truly agile project when DIUx arranged to build a tanker refueling planning tool in a matter of weeks, not years, in close collaboration with users. Learn about DUIx's unique approach to reshaping the vendor ecosystem and how they're making waves across this enormous ecosystem. 

Speakers
avatar for Colonel Enrique Oti

Colonel Enrique Oti

DIUx
Colonel Enrique Oti works at DIUx, focusing on projects related to agile software and hardware development, networking, and cloud compute. Prior to DIUx, Enrique was a National Security Affairs Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, where he wrote on Chinese cyber... Read More →
avatar for Raj Shah

Raj Shah

Former Managing Partner, DIUx
Prior to joining DIUx, Raj was the senior director of strategy at Palo Alto Networks, which acquired Morta Security, where he was CEO and Co-Founder. Prior to this, he was a special assistant in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and began his business career as a consultant with... Read More →


Thursday May 31, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 202

1:30pm

Safety in the Storm: Economical Defense from Existential Security Threats
Safety in the Storm: Economical Defense from Existential Security Threats

LED BY:  
Matthew Weaver, Partner, Layer Aleph, Former Rogue Leader, United States Digital Service

DESCRIPTION: The expensive & inflexible defensive strategies of increasing oversight, data "zones," multiple firewalls, and certified image/software releases have broadly failed to protect systems, users, or citizens. The speaker will share his experience responding to massive, public security failures at the largest government organizations, their partners, and Fortune 50 companies. Come hear the surprising message of hope: the most effective changes for meaningful defense can be easy on the budget and beneficial for administrators, civil servants, support staff, developers, users & citizens. Be relieved, as you learn that your most valuable help can come from a larger, less constrained talent pool than you expected. Be surprised, as you learn that the heretical truths necessary for the of security your organization, or program, number only five.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Government and business executives, program or project leadership, contractor or government development or operations management, developers or operators of any stripe, community organizers, and NGO executives, management, or staff. 

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Junior Ballroom 1

1:30pm

Same team! Same team! How We Built a Successful Government - Contractor Relationship at the VA
Same Team! Same Team! How We Built a Successful Government - Contractor Relationship at the VA

LED BY:  
Shane Russell, Engineering Team Lead, United States Digital Service at Veterans Affairs 
Alex Prokop, Software Engineer, Nava PBC

DESCRIPTION: Government IT projects are a collaboration between public servants and contractors, but most are so fraught with issues that they hardly look like collaborations at all. For more than year, a development team at the VA has produced results using a radically integrated approach. We sit in the same room, we have retrospectives together, we write requirements together. We see ourselves as "one team." Attendees will hear from both the public servant and contractor perspectives, leaving with practical tips for building cross-functional units, and how to give contractors the right problems and the autonomy to solve them.    

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Anyone involved in delivering government IT projects: public servants who work with contractors, and contractors who work with public servants.  

Thursday May 31, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Junior Ballroom 3

2:30pm

Break
Thursday May 31, 2018 2:30pm - 3:00pm
-

3:00pm

Birds of a Feather - So You’re Working on: Innovating in a Smaller Locale
Birds of a Feather sessions bring people struggling with similar issues together to network, learn from each other and overcome isolation. Each session will focus on a different topic but all sessions will be facilitated networking where participants talk with others and share their perspective; and an opportunity for small group discussions. Birds of a Feather sessions are either “Group Therapy” focused on common challenges or “So you’re working on” focused on common elements of work.

So You’re Working on: Innovating in a Smaller Locale

FACILITATOR: Emma Burnett, Brigade Captain Code for Maine; 2018 National Advisory Council

DESCRIPTION: 
Smaller locales have smaller budgets and tiny teams. So much work comes out of big cities that it is easy to forget that small locales are redesigning their digital services too. This session goes out to the small places and considers how to make real change without the support of a big city or state.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 206

3:00pm

Birds of a Feather - So You’re Working on: Turning IT into Civic Leaders
Birds of a Feather sessions bring people struggling with similar issues together to network, learn from each other and overcome isolation. Each session will focus on a different topic but all sessions will be facilitated networking where participants talk with others and share their perspective; and an opportunity for small group discussions. Birds of a Feather sessions are either “Group Therapy” focused on common challenges or “So you’re working on” focused on common elements of work.

So You’re Working on: Turning IT into Civic Leaders

FACILITATORS:  
Eric Jackson, Digital Services Architect, City of Asheville 
Jonathan Feldman

DESCRIPTION: The foundation of IT's role is operational excellence in providing secure, well-functioning digital services to departments and to members of the community; keeping the lights on, if you will. But the pervasive transformation of every aspect of government and society by digital technology means that the role of IT must evolve beyond running systems and fixing problems. We must help our colleagues navigate new relationships with the community and new ways of solving problems. We must support learning about data and data science and provide guidance on new models for engaging with the community around data. Jonathan Feldman and Eric Jackson from the City of Asheville will facilitate a conversation about how to make that transition successfully.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 205

3:00pm

Blameless Post-Mortems
Blameless Post-Mortems

LED BY:  
John Allspaw, Co-Founder, Adaptive Capacity Labs & Former CTO, Etsy 

DESCRIPTION: Incidents in such as outages represent valuable opportunities to understand how your systems actually behave (as opposed how you imagine they do). When performed well, post-incident debriefings (sometimes called "post-mortems") can shed critically-important light on many different aspects of these important events. This session will cover some techniques and necessary conditions to make the best use of time in a post-incident debriefing and analysis program.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Anyone (technical or not!) working in a software-reliant organization whose service depends on applications and systems working reliably. CTO/CIOs.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 208

3:00pm

Changing the Government from the Inside Out
Changing the Government from the Inside Out

LED BY:  
Amy Wilson, Director, Innovation.gov,
Brooke Dine, National Institute of Health
Julia Begley-Grey, Senior Advisor, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau   

DESCRIPTION: Culture change requires a movement, not a mandate--it takes an "all hands on deck" approach. Together, more than 1,000 innovators have banded together to co-create a shared definition of "innovation" in government on Innovation.gov and the Better Government Movement around how to learn, share, and build a 21st century government.

For this session, Presidential Innovation Fellow and Better Government Movement Amy J. Wilson and two other leaders in the Movement will lead you through how a collective movement is co-creating a better government from the inside out that delivers better results at lower cost for the people, by the people. It involves defining what we mean by a better government, telling stories of innovation, and finally creating spaces for experimentation and learning. She'll also lead a discussion around how can we infuse more public-private partnerships to spur deeper culture change.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Those looking to build a grassroots, intrapreneur-focused movement with empathy and inclusivity. Those curious about, dabblers in and professionals in innovation/21st Century Government need attend.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 201

3:00pm

Collaboration in Modern GovTech: The Power of Cross-Sectoral Partnerships
Collaboration in Modern GovTech: The Power of Cross-Sectoral Partnerships

LED BY:  
Matt Broffman, Innovation Official, Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer
Alex Pajusi, Chief Technology Officer, ViewPoint Government Solutions 
Scott Mauvais, Director, Microsoft Cities 
Katy Podbielski, Program Manager, City Innovate

DESCRIPTION: Government change-makers throughout the country are leveraging modern technology and cross-sectoral partnerships to improve services and bring more value to their communities. Using research, programs, and processes developed by Code for America, Startup In Residents and others, governments are collaborating with technology vendors to bake these best practices into their products and services. Come see how governments, govtech companies, and non-profits have partnered to produce powerful results and learn how you can bring these same approaches back to your organization.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Government employees and elected officials, Brigade members, non-profit companies and advocates, commercial vendors

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Grand Ballroom G & H

3:00pm

Data + Policy: Lobbying with Jupyter Notebook
Data + Policy: Lobbying with Jupyter Notebook

LED BY:  
Sarah Henry, Juan Lopez, Former Director of Tech and Innovation, LA City Controller's Office  
Hunter Owens, Data Scientist, City of Los Angeles 
Vyki Englert, Data Strategist, Complier LA

DESCRIPTION: In early 2018 California State Senator Scott Wiener introduced SB-827, Planning and Zoning: Transit-Rich Housing Bonus.This is a highly contentious bill with significant implications to California’s housing crisis. Policy Club, a small group of volunteers with experience in local government, public relations, and data science digitized the specifications of the bill including local zoning codes to map the potential impacts of the bill at the parcel level. Panelist will share their experiences moving from years of work in local gov and Code for America brigades to working on policy analysis and lobbying in Sacramento. Come if you're part of one of these groups today, or are thinking about starting or joining one. Let's all learn together, and only make new mistakes!

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Anyone curious about state policy, or how data might be used in policy processes in general for estimating and measuring impacts.  

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 202

3:00pm

Designing Open Source Projects that Mobilize Communities
Designing Open Source Projects that Mobilize Communities

LED BY:  
John Jones, Vice President of Interactive Strategies, Case Foundation 
Jordan Kasper, Engineer, Code.mil
Alvin Salehi, Senior Technology Advisor, The White House
Simi Damani, Software Engineer, City of Austin

DESCRIPTION: For open source, civic-focused projects to thrive and benefit society in a positive way, they must engage with contributors of both a technical and non-technical nature. Civic and societal problems are not solved with technical infrastructure alone. Rather, useful solutions come from diverse teams of technologists, stakeholders, and every day citizens impacted by the problem. Hear from leading technologists who are spearheading civic open source projects that unite stakeholders from across spectrums – from government and tech-based companies; to social impact organizations. They will discuss their experiences, what they've seen in both the civic tech and broader tech community, and actionable steps CfA Brigade members can take to better activate their own community of contributors.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Open source is at the heart of almost everything we do, and so all attendees can find value in this session. However, more specifically: regular open source contributors, project leaders, lead developers/contributors, and those wishing to expand their organizations’ engagement with open source will find the most value in this session.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Grand Ballroom A & B

3:00pm

How Brigade-Government Relationships are Renewing Civic Infrastructure
How Brigade-Government Relationships are Renewing Civic Infrastructure

LED BY:  
Dawn McDougall, Brigade NAC/Code for Philly 
Tim Wisniewski, Chief Data Officer and Director of the Office of Open Data and Digital Transformation, City of Philadelphia
Lauren Lockwood, Former Chief Digital Officer, City of Boston  
Nina Kin, Brigade NAC/Hack for LA,  
Mateo Clark, Senior Application Developer, City of Austin 
Jill Bjers, Code for Charlotte 
Keri Shearer, IT Decision Analytics Manager, City of Charlotte

DESCRIPTION: Brigades across the country want to help improve the way government works and add capacity, but local government often struggles to utilize this help. This panel-style talk focuses on the process by which Brigades and cities/regions can collaborate for right-sized impact. The discussion will center on some of the straightforward challenges government faces and the many ways that Brigades can be helpful to government outside of delivering software. We will also surface some of the stickier challenges that persist and ways that some Brigades have attempted to meet those harder challenges. For municipal and state governments currently without a Brigade, we'll touch on ways that civic tech communities have formed from the groundswell of energy around civic engagement. This panel will be instructive for Brigades and cities/regions while also providing insight for state-level government.  

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Brigade members, government leaders and staffers at all levels looking to improve their civic infrastructures through collaboration  

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 207

3:00pm

How Can You Measure Your Criminal Justice System? All Of It!
How Can You Measure Your Criminal Justice System? All Of It!

LED BY:  
Steve Spiker, Data Evangelist, Measures for Justice

DESCRIPTION: Six years ago we were told that no-one could ever unlock and publish criminal justice system data for the USA, and that no-one would ever agree on standard measures. Today we have six entire states published, from arrest, to courts, to supervision, and we're adding more fast; we’ll have 20 states live by 2020. We're making open data in an opaque system with stakeholders across the country, and we're building open source tools as we go.

We will cover the process of getting agreement on the measures that illustrate a complex system, our massive data collection process, and our pipeline for processing these vast data into meaningful measures. We will show some of our soon to be released open source tech products that MfJ has built to do this work, from scraping, to data matching, and coding charges to align across counties and states. We’ll walkthrough our data portal and the ways we visualize these data, along with free data downloads. This session will also touch on innovative legislation that is making transparency in the criminal justice system a reality.

Lastly we’ll have a discussion about the ways you use, and wish to use criminal justice data in your communities and ways we might be able to work with your municipality.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: City, county and state government staff with an interest in the Criminal Justice system, as well as advocates who need these data. Secondary audience is technologists looking for new tools and data to use.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 203

3:00pm

How to Recruit and Hire More Design & Tech Talent
How to Recruit and Hire More Design & Tech Talent

LED BY:  
Ben Guhin, Head of Design & Technology Policy, City of Austin 
Marni Wilhite, Head of Product, City of Austin

DESCRIPTION: In June 2016, the City of Austin launched its Design, Technology, and Innovation Fellows program to bring design and technology experts from the private sector to serve tours of duty as city employees. Over the next 18 months, they hired over 35 specialists in user research, interaction design, engineering, product management, and content strategy, allowing them to build agile, multidisciplinary teams to improve outcomes for residents around recycling, permitting, homelessness, public safety, and digital services infrastructure.

Join two of the founders of Austin’s program as they share practical next steps for improving your recruiting and hiring processes. Among other areas, they’ll speak to how to write and publish positions descriptions that inspire more applicants, how to get the attention of your design and technology communities about opportunities, how to conduct interviews that really assess whether someone will be a great fit in government, and how to to get applicants to take the plunge and accept the most meaningful job they’ll ever have.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Anyone in state or local government who’s looking to recruit and hire more design and technology talent CTO/CIOs.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 204

3:00pm

Industry Standards: What Criteria Should Governments Use When Evaluating Technology Vendors?
Industry Standards: What Criteria Should Governments Use When Evaluating Vendors?

LED BY:  
Catherine Geanuracos, CEO and Co-Founder, City Grows 
Sky Kelley, Founder and CEO, Avisare, 
Matt Polega, Co-Founder and VP Operations, Mark43 
Michael Owh, Chief Procurement Officer, City of Los Angeles  
Alla Goldman Seiffert, Acting Director of Acquisition at 18F/TTS

DESCRIPTION: If we are going to build a government tech market for the digital age, we must clarify a set of standards that support the kinds of inter-operable, sustainable, resilient technologies we value. How should people procuring technology for government at the state and local levels think about selecting contractors/ suppliers? Using a values-based approach, we'll workshop a set of baseline evaluation criteria and explore contracting strategies- with the goals of supporting accountable and efficient procurement, preventing bad actors from abusing the public trust, foregrounding companies who make commitments to ethical services, and broadening the vendor pool to include startups and small businesses.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Room 210/211

3:00pm

Planning for the Cutline: When Agile Meets Deadlines
Planning for the Cutline: When Agile Meets Deadlines

LED BY:  
Gina Kim, Digital Service Expert, US Department of Veterans Affairs 
Xena Ni, Designer, Nava PBC

DESCRIPTION: Open enrollment for HealthCare.gov. Veteran appeals legislation mandated by Congress to go into effect on February 14, 2019. How do agile teams delivering public services plan for hard deadlines?

In this workshop, facilitators Gina Kim from United States Digital Services and Xena Ni, former Code for America fellow and designer at Nava PBC, will share what they learned planning for a Congressionally mandated deadline. They will show you how to lead interactive planning and prioritization exercises that you can use to reframe and prepare for your own team's deadlines. Bring your real life upcoming deadlines and leave with an action plan.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Open to all but designers and product folks may find the most value.

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Junior Ballroom 3

3:00pm

The Legacy Infrastructure is Dead, Long Live the Legacy Infrastructure
The Legacy Infrastructure is Dead, Long Live the Legacy Infrastructure

LED BY:  
Sam Kitajima-Kimbrel, Principal Engineer, Nuna Inc 
Alex Lawerence, Director of Special Projects, City of Boston Department of Innovation and Technology
Kay Ashaolu
Susanna Ronalds-Hannon

DESCRIPTION: Interfacing with legacy IT systems is a fact of life for most Government entities — you don’t always have the time, resources, or authority to rip everything up and start from scratch. How, then, do you design and implement systems using modern languages and design principles while weighed down by decades of acquired habit and vintage infrastructure? We don’t have all the answers to this challenging question, but we need to have the conversation. Join the City of Boston and Nuna, a health-tech startup working with Medicare and Medicaid, in a panel discussion on technical, organizational, and cultural approaches to solving these challenges. We’ll start with a few brief case studies of ways to successfully work alongside or evolve away from legacy systems, and will then open up the discussion to broader themes.    

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Software engineers, project/product managers, procurement, anyone in strategy or anyone else responsible for technical delivery when legacy tech is involved.  

Thursday May 31, 2018 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Junior Ballroom 1

4:00pm

Break
Thursday May 31, 2018 4:00pm - 4:30pm
-

4:30pm

A Conversation on How this Civic Pioneer Modernized from Legacy to Modern to Agile Apps
A Conversation on How this Civic Pioneer Modernized from Legacy to Modern to Agile Apps

LED BY:  
Herb Wilson, MS, MBA, Director, Health Information Services & Colorado Benefits Management System 
Eva Skidmore, Vice President, Public Sector Field Marketing, Salesforce 

DESCRIPTION: Focused on the goal of improving the citizen experience, the State of Colorado adopted a “cloud-first” philosophy for its IT modernization efforts in 2013. Nearly 90 cloud apps later, it’s no surprise the state is now a recognized leader among governments when it comes to cloud computing. With the Salesforce platform as a foundation and partner, Colorado has long-term sustainability and agility across multiple departments.

This civic pioneer, Herb Wilson, has been part of the State transformation from the beginning and is currently leading the modernization of the Colorado Benefits Management System. Join us for a lively discourse where you will hear first-hand how easy it can be to streamline unique agency processes and transform customer service with apps that are sustainable and future-ready.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Brigade members, government leaders and staffers at all levels looking to improve their civic infrastructure.

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room 210/211

4:30pm

Birds of a Feather - Group Therapy: For CIO Leadership
Birds of a Feather sessions bring people struggling with similar issues together to network, learn from each other and overcome isolation. Each session will focus on a different topic but all sessions will be facilitated networking where participants talk with others and share their perspective; and an opportunity for small group discussions. Birds of a Feather sessions are either “Group Therapy” focused on common challenges or “So you’re working on” focused on common elements of work.

Group Therapy: For CIO Leadership

FACILITATOR:  
Autumn McDonald, Director, New America California 

DESCRIPTION: This session is specifically for CIOs. Come talk about approaches to the work and what's worked and not in questions like: How do you convince your boss(es)/councils/budget people to do this? How do you make the decision whether to build a digital services team or hire within? What do you do when your leadership goes out of office and how do you bake innovation before that happens?

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room 205

4:30pm

Birds of a Feather - Group Therapy: Haters Gonna Hate or Overcoming Human Obstacles
Birds of a Feather sessions bring people struggling with similar issues together to network, learn from each other and overcome isolation. Each session will focus on a different topic but all sessions will be facilitated networking where participants talk with others and share their perspective; and an opportunity for small group discussions. Birds of a Feather sessions are either “Group Therapy” focused on common challenges or “So you’re working on” focused on common elements of work.

Group Therapy: Haters Gonna Hate or Overcoming Human Obstacles

FACILITATOR: Dan Willis, USDS

DESCRIPTION: When you’re trying to do things differently, you often run into people who simply will not budge. Maybe they’re afraid of change. Maybe they’re worried about failure. Likely it's keeping you from feeling like you can get anything done. This is one of the realities of the work: it’s hard and it can be frustrating. Come talk to others experiencing human obstacles, and share and learn how others have handled these situations so you can borrow what works and walk away with a few new ideas to try

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room 206

4:30pm

Building Preparedness: Data and Communication for Crisis Response
Building Preparedness: Data and Communication for Crisis Response

LED BY:  
Michael Zick Doherty, Sonoma Fire Info
Michael Wilkening, California Health and Human Services Agency
Bobbi Jo Price, Twilio.org

DESCRIPTION: When fires broke out across Northern and Southern California in 2017, people and organizations sprung to action en masse, including government officials, volunteers, and the private sector. But early on, the lack of reliable information about health facilities, shelter, route closures, and other critical resources made it difficult for people to get help. To address this gap, creative developers and data scientists devised methods to collect, verify, and share relevant information across government agencies and the public.

In this session, Michael Wilkening from The California Health and Human Services Administration (CHHS), Michael Zick Doherty from Sonoma Fire Info, and Bobbi Jo Price from Twilio will share how their experience building information systems in the midst of a crisis can help inform future planning and response. Lessons from this intersection of public and private spheres offers replicable insights for building preparedness for future events.

Key learnings will focus on:
Validating rapidly changing information
Building redundancy in communication systems
Collecting and visualizing disparate data sources to inform response activities


WHO SHOULD ATTEND: City officials working in emergency response or crisis management, nonprofits, developers, and other people who want to support disaster response communications.

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room 203

4:30pm

Diversity and Inclusion Made it to the Mainstream: Now what?
Diversity and Inclusion Made it to the Mainstream: Now what?

LED BY:  
Nicole Sanchez, CEO and Founder, Vaya Consulting

DESCRIPTION: For the last several years, Silicon Valley diversity and inclusion (D&I) has dominated headlines. More than ever, companies understand that D&I is a vital part of a healthy and successful company. But despite the best of intentions, we’ve seen very little progress. Why aren’t we seeing success in D&I at the scale and speed that we have come to expect from Silicon Valley? When can we go beyond talk and really build sustainable and innovative best practices for D&I? In this talk, Nicole Sanchez, CEO and Founder of tech’s leading D&I firm, Vaya Consulting, will talk about where D&I is going next and how companies can move beyond rhetoric and into action.

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Grand Ballroom A & B

4:30pm

Local Innovation and National Scale. How can we spread local solutions and increase cross-city collaboration?
Local Innovation and National Scale. How Can We Spread Local Solutions and Increase Cross-City Collaboration?

LED BY:  
Clarence Wardell, Director, What Works Cities
Jay Nath, Co-Executive Director, STIR
Mauricio Garcia, Deputy Director, Cities of Service 

DESCRIPTION: Over the past decade, the focus on building innovation capacity at the local level of government has led to a wealth of new approaches, resources, and tools to address some of our most critical challenges as a nation. However, only a handful of these novel solutions and approaches ever truly spread beyond their initial home to a broader set of cities. This panel will explore promising approaches for scaling innovations across cities, and tackle the challenges that arise in moving from awareness to implementation.

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room 208

4:30pm

Practical Do’s and Don’ts When Implementing Consumer-Facing Technology Solutions in the Health & Human Services Sector
Practical Do’s and Don’ts When Implementing Consumer-Facing Technology Solutions in the Health & Human Services Sector

LED BY:  
Sonal Ambegaokar, Senior Policy Manager 
Jennifer Wagner, Senior Policy Analyst, Center of Budget and Policy Priorities

DESCRIPTION: This session offers advice from recent experiences implementing consumer facing technology - such as text messaging, mobile apps, and chat functions – in the health and human services sector to increase consumer/citizen satisfaction and make the enrollment process more user-friendly. Panelists will share key highlights from a newly released guide of Do’s and Don’ts for health and human services agencies and advocates on implementing consumer-facing technology solutions. Please come prepared to share your own recommendations.  

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: State and local agency staff and citizen/client advocates  

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room 204

4:30pm

Staying in Government During Hard Times: A Group Therapy Session
Staying in Government During Hard Times: A Group Therapy Session

LED BY:  
Kathy Pham, former product lead and founding team member of the United States Digital Service 
Jenn Halen, political scientist and government technology researcher, University of Minnesota and Harvard Berkman Klein Center 

DESCRIPTION: The ability to work in our government and influence change at levels ranging from local to federal is a privilege that not everyone in the world has. Regardless of who is in power or what decisions are made at the top, it is still our government to build, fight for, and sustain. Come for a talk and moderated discussion to share stories about staying in government during hard times.

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room 201

4:30pm

The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly: Best practices and pitfalls as a government contractor
The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly: Best practices and pitfalls as a government contractor

LED BY:  
Laura Lanford, Senior Manager of Data Engineering 
Kaitlin Devine, Director of Innovation, Ad Hoc

DESCRIPTION: As modern software development finds its footing in the government contracting sphere, we're seeing the value of current technology being utilized to address previously intractable problems. As gratifying as it is, working with government agencies and contractors has unique challenges, but we're navigating them and so can you! Join us to learn about the best practices, dangers, and impact of modernizing government software.    
 
WHO SHOULD ATTEND: People who currently work with the Federal government or would like to work with the Federal government.  

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom 3

4:30pm

Using Discovery Sprints to Change Policy with People-Centered Policymaking
Using Discovery Sprints to Change Policy with People-Centered Policymaking

LED BY:  
Crystal Yan, Experience Designer, United States Digital Service - HHS 
Liz Odar, Digital Services Expert, United States Digital Service - DHS  
Jessica Weeden, Digital Services Expert, United States Digital Service - DHS
Judy Siegel, Digital Service Expert, United States Digital Service - VA  


DESCRIPTION: Beyond changing interfaces, user research can be used to influence big decisions. In this panel, we'll go over a few case studies that will illustrate how and when to use user research to work with lawmakers on people-centered policy making in the public sector, methods that comprise of using user research and paper prototyping to change how government leaders view current processes, and inspiring them to change the law. Attendees will learn how to use different communication techniques for presenting user research to senior government officials (as opposed to product and engineering stakeholders) through examples from several projects in the United States Digital Service portfolio.  

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Junior Ballroom 1

4:30pm

Working with Survey Data: Semi-Supervised Learning and Biased Data
Working with Survey Data: Semi-Supervised Learning and Biased Data

LED BY: 
Lukas Tencer, Senior Data Scientist, Pandora 
Claire Dorman, Senior Data Scientist, Pandora

DESCRIPTION: This talk provides examples of how to use real-world experimental or survey data in decision making. The first step is to interpret the data correctly, which can be inherently difficult since many experiments have underlying biases. We will discuss how to deal with these biases and share tips for avoiding common mistakes when dealing with data. Furthermore, we will discuss how AI algorithms can be used to make practical decisions even when we are limited to small labeled data sets, such as data from surveys.    

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: This talk will have technical elements. Familiarity with basic data analysis concepts is helpful but not necessary for learning the techniques presented.  

Thursday May 31, 2018 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Room 202

5:30pm

 
Friday, June 1
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Friday June 1, 2018 7:30am - 8:30am
West Hall

8:30am

Friday Mainstage Talks
Welcome
Jennifer Pahlka, Code for AmericaDavid Eaves, Summit Host and Lecturer, Harvard Kennedy School
Announcement of the Inaugural Code for America Community Fellows
Hashim Mteuzi, Senior Manager, Network Talent Initiative, Code for America

Video: The Brigades

You’re More Powerful Than You Think
Eric Liu, Author, Founder, Citizen University, Executive Director, Aspen Institute Program on Citizenship & American Identity
At Code for America, we believe that three major stakeholder groups have to work together to make government work as it should in a digital age: governments, vendors, and the public, also known as citizens. Eric has been writing, thinking and speaking about the role and value of government and inspired us with Gardens of Democracy, which argued that some fundamental assumptions about citizenship, society, economics, and government need updating. He continues his leadership in redefining citizenship in twenty-first century with a powerful call to own and use our power. Whether you work for or with government, inside or outside, feel marginalized, empowered, or a bit of both, Eric has a message for you that’s certain to inspire you to positive action.

From Calamity to Community
Gabriella Gomez-Mont, founder, Laboratorio para la Ciudad, Mexico City
Julie Kramer, Code for Miami
Jeff Reichman, SketchCity (the Houston Brigade)
Natalie Bednarz, City of Orlando
Gabriella started and leads Laboratorio para la Ciudad, the experimental arm and creative think tank of the Mexico City government. Part of her work involves exploring and experimenting with links between civil society and government, so when a magnitude 7.1 earthquake shook her city for 20 seconds in September 2017, causing immense damage and loss of life, she was eager to observe the ways in which both the government and the public responded to help those in peril. She hoped for the community and government to act in concert, but that wasn’t always the case.  In the meantime, as Hurricanes Harvey and Irma bore down on the southeast United States, Code for America Brigades in Texas and Florida rallied not only their own members, but a national community, to get help to those affected in real time, using simple tech tools and organizing skills.  Each of these civic leaders will share their lessons learned, their hopes and concerns, and their vision for a framework for government that helps more people because it’s powered by people.

Change is inevitable, pain is optional: a report from the field
Eric Jackson, Code for Asheville
Sabrah N’ha Raven, Code for Asheville
We often prefer to focus on the more upbeat uses of on data, like powering entrepreneurship, informing the public, and improving government services. But the data that garner the most interest can also be data that touch on deep divisions in our communities: issues of policing, of economic and racial disparity, and of the best uses of our scarce resources. Putting the data out there invites the community to use it to challenge what government is doing. Asheville, NC faced such challenges in 2017, with data-centered discussions of arrests of homeless members of the community and racial disparities in traffic stops. Code for Asheville members were in the thick of it, both as members of the community and members of City staff. How do we turn difficult discussions into constructive engagement that helps our communities move forward?

Reinventing the Safety Net
Jessica Kahn, McKinsey, former Director of Medicaid Systems for Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
Dave Guarino, Director, GetCalFresh, Code for America
Albert Garcia, CalFresh Program Manager, County of San Diego’s Health & Human Services Agency
Laura Ramos, Sr. Director, Integrated Benefits Initiative, Code for America
Ashley Meyers, Digital Services + Product Management, City and County of San Francisco
Maria Benjamin, Director of Homeownership & Below Market Rate Programs, Mayor's Office of Housing & Community Development, City and County of San Francisco
As a nation, we spend about half a trillion dollars on safety net programs for our most vulnerable people. With the continuing economic disruptions of automation and other forces, it’s more important than ever that we make every dollar count.  But today, despite what’s possible with service delivery and data, we still operate disconnected, siloed programs that are often hard to administer, hard to enroll in, and hard to take advantage of. Dedicated, passionate public servants often have little data to provide insight into the best way to improve the experience for users, or the best ways to cost-effectively increase the impact of the program. At Code for America, we’ve been experimenting with SNAP, Medicaid, and other benefits, using the delivery of the benefits and insight into user needs as a way to shape both operations and ultimately policy. While grounded in incremental improvements, we’re also pushing the field to imagine something dramatically better. One example of this approach in action in the field is the San Francisco Digital Service teams’s redesign of their affordable housing process to reduce the burden on low-income people. Join us for an honest discussion of the challenges and a provocative call to do better for our fellow Americans.

Ethics, Conscience, Technology, and Public Service
Brandon Bouier, Amazon, formerly of the Defense Digital Service and the Seattle Police Department
Cyd Harrell, former Chief of Staff at 18F
Stephanie Nguyen, Harvard Kennedy School, formerly of the United States Digital Service
Christa Harstock, Code for America
The last Code for America Summit wrapped up four days before the presidential election that put Donald Trump in the White House. Many who came to public service under the previous president found themselves grappling with newly foregrounded conflicts, but these questions of ethics and personal values were always there. What happens when you’re afraid you’re not the good guys? Were we ever the good guys? How do you engage when you disagree? What do we have to learn from the ethics crises of the big technology platforms? Why weren’t we talking about this with greater urgency earlier? Public service is never easy, but it’s a calling, and we need a much more open, honest, and respectful dialogue about how to resolve conflicting values -- in ourselves, among our teams and communities, and in our nation – if we’re going to be able to do the hard work ahead.

Friday June 1, 2018 8:30am - 10:45am
East Hall

10:45am

Break
Friday June 1, 2018 10:45am - 11:10am
East Hall

11:10am

Friday Mainstage Talks
Designing Government Platforms for Reliability, Trust, Safety and More
Mike Wilkening, Undersecretary, California Health and Human Services Agency
In 2016, Propel launched a smartphone app (FreshEBT) aimed at making it easier for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (CalFresh in California) recipients to check their balances, lookup job opportunities, find recipes, and access food coupons.  In recent months, there has been an increasing dispute between Propel and Conduent, the EBT service provider in California, over whether the volume of users accessing Conduent’s system using FreshEBT is crashing the system.  Conduent has in some instances attempted to limit access through FreshEBT.
 
At first blush, this can be seen simply as the existing order stifling a creative start-up, which is an interesting story in and of itself.  However, this story actually highlights much bigger underlying issues and is going to repeat itself. What questions need to be answered as we continue to foster an environment focusing on the client and finding better ways for clients to use and get info about their benefits? Join Michael Wilkening in a mainstage overview of a topic to be followed-up in a breakout session later on Friday.

Better Foundations, Not Better Facades
Genevieve Gaudet, Service Designer, Nava PBC
This industry can only realize our radical vision if we take the time to collectively build strong foundations, which is often times at odds with the short-term focus of agile methods. Genevieve Gaudet will talk about tools she uses at Nava Public Benefit Corporation to align multiple stakeholders around a strong shared vision, and how those practices hold everyone accountable for the realities of getting there and the outcomes that really matter for millions of Americans.

Getting From Here to There: A Sustainable Future for Public Services
Louise Downe, Director of Design and Service Standards for the UK Government at the Government Digital Service (GDS).
Emma Gasson, Head of Product, Code for America
The U.K. Government Digital Service (GDS) was set up 6 years ago to help government work better for users. Since then, GDS has built, delivered and supported a huge amount - from the single government website GOV.UK to new digital services for renewing passports or registering to vote.
The work is far from done. For government to truly work better for users, we must transform not just front-end interactions but everything involved in how government delivers services. From technology to operational delivery to the way different parts of government work (or don’t work) together.
That’s why we’re building a new model for delivering public services. One which brings together all the people involved in delivering a service - no matter what part of government they come from - and empowers them with the tools, resources, support and standards they need to help build a better government.

The Next Generation
Athena Kan, Coding It Forward
Chris Kuang, Coding It Forward
This is the seventh Code for America Summit. CfA and many others have been convening the conversations and setting an agenda for government that works for all Americans for eight years now. Every movement needs new voices, new activists, new doers, new energy. Luckily, the next generation is here. They’re fired up about a public sector that truly serves the public, they’re digital natives, and they’re ready, willing and able to do the work.


Friday June 1, 2018 11:10am - 12:30pm
East Hall

12:30pm

Lunch
Friday June 1, 2018 12:30pm - 1:30pm
West Hall

1:30pm

Agile is Dead, Long Live Agile
Agile is Dead, Long Live Agile

LED BY:  
Zachary Auerbach, Senior Software Engineer, Code for America

DESCRIPTION: Join us for a in-depth discussion of agile/extreme-programming processes intended for both technical and non-technical attendees. How can product managers, engineers, designers, and other stakeholders work together to improve their process for building and delivering software? Using the ClientComm team as case study, we'll discuss what works, what doesn't, and how this learning contributes to the larger sphere of public sector service delivery. Topics include: pair programming, test-driven development, continuous deployment (automated production code deploy), the PM-designer-engineer feedback cycle, and the importance of emotional empathy in the development of software.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Anybody interested the process of how software gets built will be welcome at this session. Non-technical stakeholders like PMs, program managers, and designers, are especially encouraged to attend, as a core focus of our discussion will be how a holistic product team integrates technical and non-technical expertise.

Friday June 1, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Junior Ballroom 3

1:30pm

Birds of a Feather - This is What Success Looks Like
Birds of a Feather sessions bring people struggling with similar issues together to network, learn from each other and overcome isolation. Each session will focus on a different topic but all sessions will be facilitated networking where participants talk with others and share their perspective; and an opportunity for small group discussions. Birds of a Feather sessions are either “Group Therapy” focused on common challenges or “So you’re working on” focused on common elements of work.

Group Therapy: This is What Success Looks Like

FACILITATOR:  
Dan Willis, USDS

DESCRIPTION: 
Change is often slow, and small, and sometimes we need to adjust our expectations. We may want to do ALL THE THINGS, but sometimes small victories can have a big impact. In this workshop participants should come prepared to share stories of small successes so others can learn from them (think really small: like you changed a sentence in an FAQ, fixed an error message, or redesigned an envelope).

Friday June 1, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 205

1:30pm

Breaking Taboos And The Elephants In The Room: We Need To Talk About The Gov Tech Vendor Ecosystem
Following Thursday’s candid main stage discussion about what needs to happen to build a competitive government technology vendor ecosystem that works for users, government and vendors, join panelists for an in-depth moderated discussion. In this breakout, our goal is to say what’s unsaid and acknowledge present difficult realities — whatever the source — to build on the progress we’ve made so far and better align every player’s interests toward better outcomes for users.


Friday June 1, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 203

1:30pm

Defying the Limits of Tech, Data & Design: Women of Color Data Scientists Cast An Unbiased Vision of the Future
Defying the Limits of Tech, Data & Design: Women of Color Data Scientists Cast An Unbiased Vision of the Future

LED BY:  
Dr. Fallon Wilson, CEO and Co-Founder, Black in Tech Nashville
Dr. Allison Scott, Chief Research Offiver, Kapor Center for Social Impact
Ayori Selassie, Product Marketing Manager, Salesforce

DESCRIPTION: This panel will examine how communities of color are using AI, data science, and qualitative research to better understand and design civic tech/govtech environments and public policy that directly benefit communities of color and cast a deliberate vision of civil society driven by unbiased data and design.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Policy makers, researchers, government officials and government CTO/CIOs

Friday June 1, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Grand Ballroom A & B

1:30pm

Deliberate Community Building
Deliberate Community Building

LED BY:  
Clint Talbert, VP of Engineering, Nuna Inc
Emma Burnett, Code for Maine/Brigade NAC

DESCRIPTION: Building working communities is hard. It’s a different skill than building a software system, but it’s still building a system and our system design training will apply. Furthermore, there is a deep connection between the technologies we create and the capabilities we empower as a result in our communities. Working at the nexus of government, government contractors, and communities is a difficult needle to thread, but a necessary one if the government will be “by the people and for the people” in this digital age. This presentation covers a few precepts: use storytelling to lead, ensure your technology empowers the engagement, anticipating the case where “it all goes wrong”, and how does this apply to my project.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: People working with a Brigade, working on a federal contract, and/or working with/on an open source project. Any place where the folks (primarily engineers, we imagine) need to turn their systems building skills toward building a community collected around a central goal/project. 


Friday June 1, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 207

1:30pm

Difficult Data, Difficult Discussions
Difficult Data, Difficult Discussions

LED BY:  
Eric Jackson, Digital Services Architect, City of Asheville

DESCRIPTION: We often prefer to focus on the more upbeat uses of open data, like powering entrepreneurship, informing the public, and improving government services. But the data that garner the most interest can also be data that touch on deep divisions in our communities: issues of policing, of economic and racial disparity, and of the best uses of our scarce resources. Putting the data out there invites the community to use it to challenge what government is doing.

We faced such challenges in Asheville in 2017, with data-centered discussions of arrests of homeless members of our community and racial disparities in traffic stops. Code for Asheville members were in the thick of it, both as members of the community and members of City staff. In this session, we’ll talk about that experience and then lead a conversation on ways to turn difficult discussions about difficult data into constructive engagement that helps our communities move forward.     

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Government staff, community activists, and brigade members working in areas where data-driven conversation is both needed and challenging (e.g., policing, economic development, housing, transportation, etc.)  


Friday June 1, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 201

1:30pm

Jumpstart Your Smart Community Efforts
Jumpstart Your Smart Community Efforts

LED BY:  
Mike Chenevey, Local Government Account Executive, Esri 
Asa Strong, GIS Solutions Engineer, Esri 

DESCRIPTION: The best way to understand what governments need, is to get the information directly from the source. Esri has worked with the software development and government communities to identify the most pressing issues of our times. This session will introduce you to the 500+ ArcGIS for State and Local Government solutions, a collection of free discipline-specific maps and apps that can be configured to meet almost any community’s needs. Deploying these apps help modernize workflows that move a smart community forward, ranging from water, law enforcement, elections, planning and more. Governments, developers, and NGOs can use these as part of an agile development strategy, for immediate wins, whether you brand them as a state or local government application, productize them as a startup, or deploy them as a NGO to get meaningful applications out, to improve operations and the civic experience.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Government, civic tech community, and non-profit organizations

Friday June 1, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 202

1:30pm

Keeping Users at the Forefront While Scaling Services
Keeping Users at the Forefront While Scaling Services

LED BY:  
Ben Sheldon, Engineering Manager, Code for America

DESCRIPTION: Building resilient and usable systems requires a balancing act between responding to the needs of technical systems and users. This session shares practices and principles that helped the GetCalFresh engineering team scale and improve their service. We'll discuss practical implementations of "Leave a Seam" (creating paths within a system for people talk to you) and daily and weekly operations rituals for keeping technical teams oriented towards meeting the needs of users and technical systems.  

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Technical, engineering and operations staff, design and product managers, and anyone involved in building or managing technical products and systems.   


Friday June 1, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 204

1:30pm

Only New Mistakes: Starting and Running a Digital Service
Only New Mistakes: Starting and Running a Digital Service

LED BY:  
Chris Govias, Chief of Design, The Canadian Digital Service 
Eman El-Fayomi, Senior User Experience Advisor
Kendra Skeene, Director of Product, GeorgiaGov Interactive 
Carrie Bishop, Chief Digital Services Officer, City and County of San Francisco
Louise Downe, Director of Design and Service Standards, UK Government DIgital Services
Matt Cutts, Acting Administrator, United States Digital Service

DESCRIPTION: Since the UK started the Government Digital Service in 2010, we've seen the US Digital Service, and 18F follow suit at the federal level, with Georgia (and soon California) at the state level, and a handful of cities including San Francisco, Asheville also taking the plunge. Now the Canadian Digital Service is the latest initiative to reshape government services. Each of these offers incredible learning opportunities for those who follow, and each is doing their best to learn from what has gone before. Across these efforts, the challenges are familiar: to build digital capability throughout the entirety of government, all while managing risk, aversion to change, and ensuring we only make new mistakes. Come if you're part of one of these groups today, or are thinking about starting or joining one. Let's all learn together, and only make new mistakes!

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Anyone working within digital government will find the case studies and lessons learned both relevant and interesting; that said, individuals in the process of starting or joining a digital service (nascent or otherwise) will find the session of particular use.  


Friday June 1, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 208

1:30pm

Research and Design for CA Child Welfare: Wins and Challenges from the Field
Research and Design for CA Child Welfare: Wins and Challenges from the Field

LED BY:  
Jesse Taggert, Director of Service Design and User Research, Child Welfare Digital Services
Antoinette Houston, Sr. Lead UX Engineering Consultant, Cambria Solutions  
Diana Persell, User Experience Research and Design Consultant, Persell Design Group  
Daniel Scribner, Product Manager, Case Commons 
Liz Lin, Manager / Design Lead, Cambria Solutions

DESCRIPTION: Come hear from current and recent researchers/designers on California's CWDS project, who will discuss:

  • User research and design with a dozen of dedicated stakeholders and SMEs
  • Matrix managing CA first design team team in a modular contracting environment
  • Design systems in a learning, legacy project
  • Policy and research and product strategy-how that works
  • Decentralized vs centralized design teams

Friday June 1, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 210/211

1:30pm

Using Data + Design to Innovate with Purpose
Using Data + Design to Innovate with Purpose

LED BY:  Nathan Shetterley, Global Group Director, Data + Design, Fjord, part of Accenture Interactive 

DESCRIPTION: How can your organization use data and analytics to elevate the experience of users and improve government services? During this session, hear how taking a design-led approach that blends human-centered design and advanced analytics solves complex, at scale challenges. Then dive into a fast-paced, interactive workshop to discover new ways to gain real world insight and tell high-impact stories that bring complex data to life for diverse stakeholders and executive decision-makers.

Friday June 1, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Grand Ballroom G & H

1:30pm

Using Hyperledger Blockchain Technologies to Deliver Government Services
Using Hyperledger Blockchain Technologies to Deliver Government Services

LED BY:  
Tracy Kuhrt, Community Architect, Hyperledger
Ry Jones, Community Architect, Hyperledger
David Boswell, Director of Ecosystem, Hyperledger

DESCRIPTION: Learn how governments use blockchain technologies and permissioned ledgers to deliver services. This session will introduce Hyperledger, The Linux Foundation's open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies. We will also present a number of existing use case tutorials that showcase service delivery using Hyperledger projects. The session will conclude with an interactive discussion with the audience about how they consider using blockchain technologies and common challenges to overcome.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Anyone interested in learning more about blockchain at either a technical or business level is encouraged to attend. This talk will have technical elements, although it will be accessible to any skill level. More technical discussions can continue at the Technology Fair.

Friday June 1, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Junior Ballroom 1

2:45pm

Birds of a Feather - So You’re Working on: Design Literacy
Birds of a Feather sessions bring people struggling with similar issues together to network, learn from each other and overcome isolation. Each session will focus on a different topic but all sessions will be facilitated networking where participants talk with others and share their perspective; and an opportunity for small group discussions. Birds of a Feather sessions are either “Group Therapy” focused on common challenges or “So you’re working on” focused on common elements of work.

So You’re Working on: Design Literacy

FACILITATOR:  
Jesse Taggert, Director of Service Design and User Research, Child Welfare Digital Services

DESCRIPTION: Come meet others who are working on design literacy across organizations large and small. Topics of discussion will include design and literacy at the executive level, within teams, understanding what’s a successful project, what’s in flight and what are the principles of design literacy. This is a good session for seasoned designers working in a new environment or people new to design.

Friday June 1, 2018 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 206

2:45pm

Building a Sustainable Future for Public Services
Building a Sustainable Future for Public Services

LED BY:  
Lou Downe, Director of Design for the UK Government

DESCRIPTION: The U.K. Government Digital Service (GDS) started 6 years ago is far from done. To keep our promise of government truly working better for users, we must transform everything involved in how government designs and delivers services - not just front-end interactions. From technology to operational delivery, from the way policy is created to the way different parts of government work (or don’t work) together.

In this breakout, learn from Lou Downe, Director of Design for the UK Government as they go into more detail about what’s needed to fundamentally change how government works, and the critical role that design and design standards play.

Friday June 1, 2018 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Junior Ballroom 3

2:45pm

CFA Alumni Q & A
Friday June 1, 2018 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 205

2:45pm

Cookie Swap: Bring Your Things that Worked Making Digital Service

Cookie Swap: Bring Your Things that Worked Making Digital Service

LED BY:  
Laura Kadamus, Digital Services Expert, United States Digital Service

DESCRIPTION: Bring your tasty treats that worked in building and running digital services teams. Playbooks, hiring processes, tactics, culture artifacts, team structures, songs, whatever. But present your winning tactics to others in the room, and make sure you have a way of sharing them with others who'd like to borrow and/or adapt them. This is a unique interactive session format in which everyone leaves with goodies! (virtual ones at least!)

Friday June 1, 2018 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 208

2:45pm

Customer Selection and Product Roadmapping for the Government Technology Market

Customer Selection and Product Roadmapping for the Government Technology Market

LED BY:  
Mitchell Weiss, Professor of Management Practice, Harvard Business School

DESCRIPTION: What makes great government buyers? Government technology sellers want to find them and innovative government leaders want to be them. But how? This session will cover customer selection and product roadmapping for the government technology market. It will leverage a Harvard Business School case study on Mark43 for an energetic and participatory conversation. Scott Crouch and his team at Mark43 had barely finished rolling out their new police records management system in Washington D.C. in late summer 2015, when the prospect of an even bigger customer surfaced: the Los Angeles Police Department’s RFP for a new RMS in L.A. would hit the street soon. Should Mark43 bid on it? Attendees in this session will debate Mark43’s options and, along the way, cover techniques for:

  • Sizing government technology markets
  • Weighing small market customers vs. the largest ones
  • Uncovering who, exactly, within government organizations to sell to
  • Evaluating new RFP opportunities and the openness to new players
  • Scaling government market sales organizations as they grow


Friday June 1, 2018 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 202

2:45pm

Delivering Workforce Services in the Digital Age
Delivering Workforce Services in the Digital Age

LED BY:  
Annelise Grimm, Senior Manager of Criminal Justice and Workforce Development, Code for America 
Virginia Hamilton, Senior Advisor for Design Thinking and Innovation, American Institutes for Research
Laura Willams, Economic Graph, LinkedIn
Junious Williams, Principal, Junious Williams Consulting 


DESCRIPTION: Too often, people who need the most help finding work are stuck using antiquated tools and methods to get there. This session is all about designing and implementing a workforce system where job seekers and employers are equipped with the best possible tools to achieve their goals. Presenters will share stories about how new technologies are improving the efficiency and efficacy of workforce programs and job centers, while sharing the areas where technology alone cannot solve the problem. They'll discuss how the workforce system can anticipate and act proactively given the changes in the economy and world of work. You'll leave with a better understanding of the challenges faced by the workforce systems and ideas you can take home and put into action tomorrow, next month, and next year.  
WHO SHOULD ATTEND: This session would be ideal for anyone who is interested in re-envisioning the role that government can play in the workforce space. Government staff, service providers, policy wonks and dreamers welcome.

Friday June 1, 2018 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Grand Ballroom G & H

2:45pm

Designing Government Platforms for Reliability, Trust and Safety and More
Designing Government Platforms for Reliability, Trust and Safety and More

LED BY:  
Michael Wilkening, Undersecretary of California Health and Human Services Agency 
Dan Kalamaras, Director of the Office of Systems Integration
Kim McCoy-Wade, Chief of the CalFresh Branch
Keri Tippins, Attorney at California Department of Social Services

DESCRIPTION: How can governments foster environments that focus on users and find better ways for users to use and get information about benefits? What are the models for platform operating costs? Who has what liability in event of data breach - government, the platform vendor(s), third party clients or more? How do we design for user trust? Join a breakout panel discussion with California’s Health and Human Services Agency and departments and help explore the issues.



Friday June 1, 2018 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Grand Ballroom A & B

2:45pm

How Agile Methods Help Non-Technical Government Teams Get Things Done

How Agile Methods Help Non-Technical Government Teams Get Things Done

LED BY:  
Michelle Thong, Service Innovation Lead, City of San Jose 
Alvina Nishimoto, Agile Coach, City of San Jose
Erica Garaffo, Data Analytics Lead, City of San Jose
Ramses Madou, Transportation Planning Manager, City of San Jose
C.J. Ryan, Program Manager, City of San Jose

DESCRIPTION: Throughout the City of San Jose, from Parks to Transportation, non-technical government teams are adopting Agile methods such as Scrum and Kanban. Though these methods were originally developed in the manufacturing and software industries, they can be applied in government to establish the virtuous habits of prioritizing, collaborating, and staying aligned as a team. In this panel, we'll provide an introduction to Agile methods, share our lessons learned, and give you tips on how to get started with your own team.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Non-technical government staff, but it’s relevant for anyone who wants to help their teams work better and smarter, whether in government or not, whether technical or not.


Friday June 1, 2018 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 210/211

2:45pm

2:45pm

Moving From an In-House CMS to Drupal at the City of Bloomington

Moving From an In-House CMS to Drupal at the City of Bloomington

LED BY:  
Cliff Ingham, Systems and Applications Manager, City of Bloomington

DESCRIPTION: In 2017 we re-launched the City of Bloomington's public website (bloomington.in.gov). While any website migration is difficult, the transition from a custom in-house CMS to Drupal came with a lot of challenges and considerations. This presentation reflects on the lessons learned in launching a new website essentially from the ground up while managing your existing web presence.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Governments and communities interested in deploying the open source Drupal CMS, reducing/streamlining content, and integrating Drupal with their other systems (Google Calendars API, Animal Shelter, Boards & Commissions, etc.)

Friday June 1, 2018 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 204

2:45pm

Why Would Anyone Want To Work Here?

Why Would Anyone Want To Work Here?

LED BY:  
Ben Guhin, Head of Design & Technology Policy, City of Austin 
Marni Wihite, Head of Product, City of Austin 

DESCRIPTION: You’ve probably noticed that designers and developers are looking for a slightly different work environment than the typical government employee. Well, that’s an understatement. In many cases, they’re looking for a very different environment, and the City of Austin has been prototyping new ways of supporting creative teams while hiring over 35 design and technology specialists from the private sector in just 18 months.

Join two of the leaders of Austin’s transformation and learn how it’s possible to do this in local government and the many aspects of creative culture that should be top-of-mind as you introduce new people, projects, and processes into your city.

Friday June 1, 2018 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Room 207

4:00pm

Town Hall and Closing
Friday June 1, 2018 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Grand Ballroom A & B